Agriculture

Biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes: soil by Graham R. Stirling

By Graham R. Stirling

This booklet is subdivided into six sections. After an preliminary introductory bankruptcy, the second one part covers the soil setting and the organisms that stay in soil, and the way they're stimulated by way of vegetation and farming structures. The 3rd and fourth sections care for the common enemies of nematodes (parasitic and predatory fungi, invertebrate predators, bacterial parasites and viruses), and a various variety of fungal and bacterial symbionts that experience the ability to intervene not directly with nematode improvement. equipment of decreasing populations of plant-parasitic nematodes via organic capacity are mentioned within the 5th part, with a specific concentrate on an idea known as 'integrated soil biology management'. the ultimate part summarizes the details made within the publication, and provides a few feedback on priorities for destiny study. it is also a bankruptcy that encourages advisors and practitioners to consider the organic prestige in their soils, and offers instructions on how soil organic techniques can be used to lessen losses from nematode pests. on hand In Print

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Extra info for Biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes: soil ecosystem management in sustainable agriculture

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G. a resistant/tolerant cultivar or rootstock, or a non-host rotation crop) will be an important component of any management system that is devised. One potential problem with management systems that aim to enhance suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes is that in many agricultural soils, the predatory component of the soil food web may already have been eliminated or severely depleted by many years of mismanagement. In such situations, remediation measures are likely to be needed, and it may take many years to restore a fully functional soil biological community.

In some cropping systems and environments, serious nematode pests of the principal crop may not be present, and so when sustainable soil and crop management systems are being developed, it is not necessary to include tactics that target particularly damaging nematode species. Improving soil health and enhancing suppressiveness to soilborne pests may be all that is required to minimize losses from plant-parasitic nematodes. g. a resistant/tolerant cultivar or rootstock, or a non-host rotation crop) will be an important component of any management system that is devised.

A typical soil aggregate contains sand, silt and clay particles bound together by organic substances and micro­ organisms, and the pore space provides a number of niche habitats (Fig. 6). Bacteria either occupy microsites less than 5 mm in diam­ eter, attach themselves to fragments of organic matter or live in water films, while fungi grow over the surface of soil particles or are confined to contiguous pores that are at least as wide as the diameter of their hyphae. Most protozoans are small enough to occupy the cavities depicted in Fig.

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