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Mathematics and Culture II: Visual Perfection: Mathematics by Michele Emmer

By Michele Emmer

Creativity performs a big position in all human actions, from the visible arts to cinema and theatre, and particularly in technology and arithmetic .

This quantity, released in basic terms in English within the sequence "Mathematics and Culture", stresses the robust hyperlinks among arithmetic, tradition and creativity in structure, modern paintings, geometry, special effects, literature, theatre and cinema. So this publication is designed not just for mathematicians yet for all of the those who be interested within the a variety of elements of tradition, either medical and literary, with a distinct emphasis at the visible aspects.

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Mathematics and Culture II: Visual Perfection: Mathematics and Creativity

Creativity performs an incredible position in all human actions, from the visible arts to cinema and theatre, and specifically in technology and arithmetic . This quantity, released in basic terms in English within the sequence "Mathematics and Culture", stresses the robust hyperlinks among arithmetic, tradition and creativity in structure, modern paintings, geometry, special effects, literature, theatre and cinema.

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12] Gombrich [3] p. 121. [13] B. C. 1. See also D. Schattschneider, “The Fascination of Tiling”, in M. ), The Visual Mind (Cambridge MA: MIT Press, 1993) pp. 157–164. [14] Gombrich [3] p. 9. [15] K. Williams, “Environmental Patterns: Paving Designs by Tess Jaray”, in Nexus Network Journal 2 (2000): 87–92, pp. 88–89. [16] T. Jaray, personal correspondence. [17] T. Jaray, “The Expressive Power of Brickwork”, in Architects Journal 6 (November 1997) pp. 6–7. [18] C. Alexander, 1977. A Pattern Language (New York: Oxford University Press, 1977) p.

In 1925, Max Ernst introduced his frottage technique, where the springboard was created by randomly placing sheets of paper on the surface of an old wooden floor and taking rubbings with black lead. Ernst regarded this as a major breakthrough, remarking, “in gazing intently at the drawings thus obtained I was surprised by the sudden intensification of my visionary capacities”. By the 1940s, Ernst had moved on to a new technique where paint was dripped onto a horizontal canvas from a leaking can swung randomly through the air on a piece of string.

In reality, the low D values evident during the early stages of the painting process simply caused the observer to perceive objects in the dripped patterns (even though they were not there) and these perceptions were then suppressed (making the objects apparently disappear) as D rose to the high value which characterized the complete pattern ([2]. Pollock’s desire to paint fractal patterns is not surprising. Our initial perception studies revealed that over ninety percent of 120 participants found fractal imagery to be more visually appealing than non-fractal imagery [9, 10].

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